Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC: Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 8 months ago #11461

  • DrJames
  • DrJames's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 1965
  • Thank you received: 7218
  • Karma: 109
If you would like to read a well informed article about Big Pharma and their "We have to charge a lot because we spend so much on R&D" BS then read this:

www.medpagetoday.com/PublicHealthPolicy/HealthPolicy/34103

They calculated that, far from spending $1.3 billion to develop each successful NCE, drug companies often shell out less than $100 million.
Of the purported $1.3 billion average, "half... comes from estimating how much profit would have been made if the money had been invested in an index fund of pharmaceutical companies that increased in value 11% a year, compounded over 15 years," they wrote, citing the research center at Tufts University in Boston that produced the estimate (J Health Econ 2003;22:151-85).


According to a published estimate by Lexchin and a different co-author, pharmaceutical companies spend only 1.3% of revenues on discovering NCEs versus 25% on promotion (PLoS Med 2008; 5:e1)

"This hidden business model for pharmaceutical research, sales, and profits has long depended less on the breakthrough research that executives emphasize than on rational actors exploiting ever broader and longer patents and other government protections against normal free market competition," Light and Lexchin wrote in BMJ.
YMMV
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: 2b, mgalbrai, Gaj, Hieupham, sonix, Hazel, CC2B

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 8 months ago #11490

  • sonix
  • sonix's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Elite Member
  • Music is life
  • Posts: 165
  • Thank you received: 359
  • Karma: 2
No surprise there. I wish we could bring back the classic old values of humanity and ethics.
M 61yo HCV+ ~ 30 yrs Gt1a F2 VL 223,000 ALT 54 AST 42 Tx start Sof/Dac 17Dec15.
SVR4 at 7Apr16 ALT 22 AST 22
SVR12 at 9Jun16 ALT 23 AST 25
Melbourne, Australia
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: mgalbrai, Hieupham

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 8 months ago #11515

  • Hazel
  • Hazel's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 414
  • Thank you received: 1699
  • Karma: 39
revolting. very useful snippet of research though, neat and tidy figures to use.
Genotype 3 30 years, 2x treatment interferon/ribavirin non responder. Cirrhosis 17 years. Fibroscan, decompensating, 40 down to 22 by 29/3/16- now down to 6.5, normal, no cirrhosis. Started Buyers Club Sof/Dac 14 Nov 15. SVR 12 29/0716
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Gaj

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 6 months ago #15136

  • Hazel
  • Hazel's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 414
  • Thank you received: 1699
  • Karma: 39
I am bumping this back up because it is one of the links I copy and paste the most when 'informing' (hassling) media, politicians, doctors, and my poor lecturers. It shocks and shuts up everyone as their first objection forms. I usually preface it with " not double, not triple, not ten times but 19.1..."
Genotype 3 30 years, 2x treatment interferon/ribavirin non responder. Cirrhosis 17 years. Fibroscan, decompensating, 40 down to 22 by 29/3/16- now down to 6.5, normal, no cirrhosis. Started Buyers Club Sof/Dac 14 Nov 15. SVR 12 29/0716
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Joy, mgalbrai, Gaj

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 6 months ago #15138

  • Greedfighter
  • Greedfighter's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Posts: 609
  • Thank you received: 1732
  • Karma: 21


It's all about greed.
Gt 1a, F0, VL 6.5 million, AST 59, ALT 62
Started Twinvir 1/15/16
6 wk. labs VL UND, AST 27, ALT 20
EOT labs VL UND, AST 23, ALT 19
SVR 16, VL UND, AST 28, ALT 17
SVR 24 , VL UND, 10/8/16
SVR 125, VL UND, 9/22/18
SVR 230, VL UND, 10/3/20
Last Edit: 5 years 6 months ago by Greedfighter.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: DrJames, mgalbrai, Tina-Hill-facebook, IRMA88, Hazel, katy8katy0

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 5 months ago #15868

  • mgalbrai
  • mgalbrai's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Moderator
  • Posts: 1327
  • Thank you received: 2695
  • Karma: 26
I got this from HepMag on 5/11/16:

David Belk,
Board Certified in Internal Medicine

About two and a half years ago, a pharmaceutical company developed a miracle cure with the potential to eradicate a terrible disease from our planet. It was an American pharmaceutical company, so this miracle cure can be seen as a triumph for our using a market system to encourage the development of cures. With this cure we could potentially wipe out a significant disease for the first time since small pox was eradicated almost 40 years ago.
And yet two and a half years later, this disease has remained almost completely untouched.
Why no miracle? Does the cure take a long time? No: From the time the treatment is started, it takes only about 12 weeks. Is it difficult to administer? No: 1-2 pills a day, taken at home, for twelve weeks. Are the pills hard to get, or expensive to make? Well that depends on exactly what you mean.
First, let’s set the stage.
The disease is hepatitis C: a virus that slowly destroys a person’s liver, usually over the course of several decades. It’s not easy to catch and doesn’t have many symptoms until the late stages. Prior to 1992 it was spread mostly through blood transfusions, when no one knew how to screen for it. It can also be spread by contaminated needles. The most common ways to contract hepatitis C today are by IV drug use, and being a health care worker who is accidentally stuck by a needle. Because hepatitis C is so hard to transmit, the number of people who contract it each year in the developed world has declined significantly in the last 25 years.
Still, an estimated 3-5 million people have hepatitis C in the United States, with 7-9 million more in Europe and perhaps another 185 million worldwide. If left untreated, many of these people will eventually suffer from liver failure or liver cancer, and die if they don’t receive a liver transplant.
Hepatitis C has been treatable for many years but previous treatments were far from adequate. They required expensive injections that had many side effects and often didn’t work. Then, in late 2013 Gilead Sciences released a revolutionary new drug called Sovaldi which was more effective and far easier to use than prior hepatitis C treatments, and then in 2014, an even better treatment called Harvoni.
These two wonder drugs can potentially cure hepatitis C over 90 percent of the timein just 12 weeks. That’s even more impressive than it seems: since hepatitis C is so difficult to transmit, eliminating most of the carriers with oral medication could lower the transmission rate to the point where the remainder of the disease would likely disappear on its own.
But that hasn’t happened yet. In fact, surprisingly few cases of hepatitis C have been cured by these wonder drugs. According to Gilead Science’s own records only 378 thousand people in the US have been treated with either Sovaldi or Harvoni, another 145 thousand people in Europe, and 250 thousand people in the entire rest of the world combined (slides 27-28). That means that, after two years, only about 10 percent of people with hepatitis C in the US, 2 percent of Europeans and a small fraction of a percent of those in the rest of the world who have this disease gotten this miracle cure.
2016-04-25-1461600807-3310278-GileadGraphs.jpg
So we return to our first question: why?
The main reason appears to be that these drugs are really incredibly expensive, so almost no one can afford them. Solvaldi cost $1,000 a pill when it was released in the US and Harvoni cost $1,125 a pill. These drugs are somewhat less expensive in other countries, but they cost at least $50,000 to $100,000 for a full course in any developed country. In fact, Sovaldi was the single most costly drug for Medicare’s prescription drug plan in 2014, costing Medicare over $3 billion to treat about 33 thousand people.
That’s too much money for most people — and most insurance plans — to spend on curing a disease that, while often lethal, usually takes many years to kill a person.
Yet since Gilead released these two medications, they’ve tripled their annual revenue, and last year alone, they had a 55 percentafter tax profit margin. That’s one of the highest profit margins for any corporation in any industry. Gilled mademore in profit last year than Bank of America, Exxon Mobil, General Motors, Walmart, Microsoft or any of the other pharmaceutical companies.
2016-04-25-1461600922-5256109-GileadGraphs2.jpg
This shows two things. First, their business model — pricing a wonder drug out of the reach of nearly everyone who needs it — works, provided you care only about money. But second, it shows that clearly the drug could be sold profitably for much less. So the question is: why not reduce the price and and make up the profit in volume of sales?
If Gilead did that, they could possibly eradicate hepatitis C. That’s good for the world, but terrible for their future finances. By treating only a few patients each year, the infection pool stays large enough to maintain Gilead’s revenue for years to come.
This example shows that our current method of funding medical research has a downside. We allow pharmaceutical companies to name their own prices for drugs with the promise they’ll use that money to fund research that might develop miracle cures. This system can provide a great incentive for finding new cures. But then it can also provide an equally strong incentive to avoid eliminating a disease, at least in most people. Why would any company want to wipe out a disease and so kill its own Golden Goose?
Clearly the Gilead example shows that the purely market-driven system can work. The question is: does it work the way we want it to?

Sorry about the jpeg links. They weren't active on the HepMag post.
m
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
forums.delphiforums.com/generichcvtx

G 1a F-1
Started tx 10/23/15 (Meso sof & led) ALT 48 AST 28 v/l 1.6 mil
11/17/15 4 wk lab ALT 17 AST 16 <15
11/18/15 Started Harvoni
12/16/15 8 wk lab ALT: 15 AST: 13 V/l UND
1/14/16 Fin. Tx
7/07/16 UND SVR 24
Last Edit: 5 years 5 months ago by mgalbrai.
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: DrJames, Joy, Hazel, Matt-Kenney-google, Defeat10

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 5 months ago #15869

  • Matt-Kenney-google
  • Matt-Kenney-google's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Platinum Member
  • Avatar-Gaelic for "Welcome"
  • Posts: 424
  • Thank you received: 1314
  • Karma: 10
Man-oh-man! All the right questions but still short on answers, huh Mike. Thanks for posting this. At least we see it's still being talked about. :)
GT1a; Got it some time in the 70's; Diagnosed @1976
Tx naive
METAVIR: A2-F2
SOT May 18, 2016: CMP: AST 162 ALT 241 VL 13000000
3 weeks after SOT: AST 27 ALT 31 VL 138
Reached EOT Aug. 10, 2016 / Received svr4 results Sept. 20, 2016: AST 22 ALT 24
Hep C RNA "NOT DETECTED"
AS OF 3/20/2017 ,Hep C RNA PCR "NOT DETECTED" THAT'S SVR24!
The administrator has disabled public write access.
The following user(s) said Thank You: DrJames, mgalbrai

Big Pharma spending 19:1 Marketing:R&D 5 years 5 months ago #15895

  • Defeat10
  • Defeat10's Avatar
  • Offline
  • New Member
  • Posts: 13
  • Thank you received: 52
  • Karma: 0
May they all enjoy each other's company in Dante's 4th circle oh Hell.
G1a
Fibrosure F3
VL 6.6mil
Alt151 Ast111
All labs/Nov 2015
May 5th tx started Hepcvir L. Redemption 2 trial
May 19 2 week labs VL 27, Alt 25 Ast 24
The administrator has disabled public write access.
Time to create page: 0.085 seconds

Copyright © 2015-2020 FixHepC

Back to Top