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Multiple genotype 4 years 4 months ago #26951

What if you have more than one genotype infection, can you still be cured?
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Multiple genotype 4 years 4 months ago #26953

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Yes, it makes no difference to cure rates provided the correct drugs are chosen.

Dual genotypes are reported at about a 10% rate in Europe versus 1% in places like the USA. It’s more about the reporting than any real difference.

The actual rate is something like 5-25% so it is common in patients but under reported by pathologists.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4296219/
YMMV
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Multiple genotype 4 years 4 months ago #26954

Ok thank you , If someone has two genotypes will they get more sick than someone that just has one or does that even matter?
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Multiple genotype 4 years 4 months ago #26955

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Hi Mark,

Dual genotypes are common and patients are neither sicker nor weller.

Before pan-genotypic treatment like Sofosbuvir+Daclatasvir or Sofosbuvir+Velpatasvir we did see the odd patient treated with Harvoni for GT1 relapse with either GT2 or GT3 (Harvoni does not work for these) so presumably they were dual GT1/2 and GT1/3.

So in short there's no problem treating and it's more or less the same as for everyone else with Hep C. You get rid of it and you feel better and your long term health outlook is better.
YMMV
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Multiple genotype 4 years 3 months ago #27032

So when one is tested for genotype, does the test detect all the genotypes you have or do you have to take more than one test to detect different genotypes?
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Multiple genotype 4 years 3 months ago #27037

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Hi Mark

The genotype testing works like this:

First you do a PCR to amplify the quantity of viral RNA you have

Then you add probes that attach to GT1, GT2, GT3, GT4, GT5, GT6

Then you wash the probes out and see how much has stuck to the viral RNA

And get results like

GT1 98%
GT2 0.0001%
GT3 0.0001%
GT4 2%
GT5 0.0001%
GT6 0.0001%

So you'd call that GT1 (which we know is a bit like GT4) and just a bit like the others.

In reality it looks like this where you can see a pure 1a and pure 1b on the left, then a 1a/1b

YMMV
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Multiple genotype 4 years 3 months ago #27041

So when you do a genotype test all positive genotypes show up from that one test? Sorry im a bit confused about this.
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Multiple genotype 4 years 3 months ago #27055

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Hello Mark,

Yes, the single genotype test comes back with the results, and this is usually one genotype.
YMMV
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